Budapest Zoo

by Arūnas
Budapesti Állatkert
Budapest Zoo, opened in 1866, is the oldest zoological garden in Hungary and one of the oldest in the world. It attracts over 1 million visitors each year.

Covering 18 hectares (44 acres), the zoo is home to over 10,500 animals representing nearly 1,100 different species. The oldest animal born and living here is Tücsök, the aging female hippo; she was born in the spring of 1973.

Budapest Zoo is one of 13 zoological gardens in Hungary. It has been traditionally working on the rescue of sick, injured, or orphaned birds, and is an accredited member of the European (EAZA) and the World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA).

My favorite animals at the Budapest Zoo

Malaysian leaf katydid

The Malaysian leaf katydid (Ancylecha fenestrata) is a rather large species of insects from Malaysia with leaf-like thickened fore wings that are characterized by two crescent-like markings. They take about 4–6 months to mature and as adults live for 6 months or more.

Malaysian leaf katydid

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Unknown.

African scarab beetle

The African scarab beetle (Pachnoda aemula) is a relatively small (length of up to 20–25 mm) species of insect native to Sub-Saharan Africa. It lives in varied habitats, mainly in tropical forests.

African scarab beetles

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Unknown.

Thorny devil stick insect

The Thorny devil stick insect (Eurycantha calcarata) is a large species (about 12 cm in length) of ground-dwelling stick insect native to New Guinea, New Caledonia, and the Solomon Islands. Both sexes are wingless. Because of their superior camouflage, they can sit in the open and remain unseen.

Thorny devil stick insect

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Unknown.

Shingleback lizard

The Shingleback lizard (Trachydosaurus rugosus) is a short-tailed, slow-moving species of blue-tongued skink found in Australia. It has a very large head and large rough scales. Mature adults typically have snout-vent lengths of 40 to 47 centimeters (16 to 18 inches).

Shingleback lizard

A bite from an adult Shingleback lizard can cause pain, but there is no venom and hence no long-term ill effect.

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Least Concern. In Western Australia, Tiliqua rugosa konowi is listed as Vulnerable.

Ringed teal

The Ringed teal (Callonetta leucophrys) is a small duck of central South America, preferring wet forests and swamps in Paraguay, Uruguay, northern Argentina, and southern Brazil. They occur in marshes and swamps with abundant vegetation and can be even seen perched on fences or low trees.

Male ringed teal

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Least Concern.

Amazonian motmot

The Amazonian motmot (Momotus momota) is a medium-sized colorful near-passerine bird found in the Amazonian forests from eastern Colombia east across southern Venezuela to the Guianas, south to northwestern Argentina, and east across most of Brazil.

Male Amazonian momot

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Least Concern.

Large hairy armadillo

The Large hairy armadillo (Chaetophractus villosus) is a New World placental mammal found in South America. An adult weighs approximately 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds), with a snout to a tail length varying from 31 to 57 centimeters (12–22 inches). The natural range of the species extends from Bolivia, Paraguay to Patagonia (Argentina) and Magallanes (Chile).

Big hairy armadillo

They are powerful and fast diggers, due to the long sharp claws on their forefeet. Individuals are known to live for 20 years.

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Least Concern.

Black-tailed prairie dog

The Black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a stout, short-legged rodent native to the Great Planes of North America. They are the most social of the ground-dwelling sciurids.

Black-tailed prairie dogs

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Least Concern.

Giant anteater

The Giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) is an insectivorous edentate mammal native to Central and South America. The species can reach 2 meters (7 feet) long from the tip of its snout to the end of its tail.

A specialized tongue allows them to eat up to 35,000 ants and termites each day. These animals are not immune to ant bites, so they feed at an ant or termite colony for just a minute or so before moving on.

Giant anteater

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Vulnerable. It is protected as a national heritage species in some provinces in Argentina.

Patagonian mara

The Patagonian mara (Dolichotis patagonum) is a relatively large diurnal herbivorous rodent found in the arid central and southern regions of Argentina, including large parts of Patagonia. Individuals are known to live for 14 years.

Patagonian maras

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Near Threatened. It is categorized as Vulnerable in the Red Book of Mammals of Argentina.

Red-necked wallaby

The Red-necked wallaby (Macropus rufogriseus) is common in the more temperate and fertile parts of eastern Australia, including Tasmania, and lives in wet and dry sclerophyll forests, as well as woodland with adjoining grassy areas.

Red-necked wallaby

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Least Concern.

Squirrel monkey

The Squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) is a New World primate species found in the tropical rainforests of South America, except in the southeastern coastal forests of Brazil. In their native habitat, they live in a group of 20 or more individuals of all ages.

Squirrel monkey

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: Least Concern.

Sumatran orangutan

The Sumatran orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus abelii) is one of the three species of orangutans. Historically, it was distributed over the entire island of Sumatra and further south into Java. The species’ range is now restricted to the north of the island with a majority in the provinces of North Sumatra and Aceh.

With only around 14,600 remaining in the wild, the species is classified as Critically Endangered. Indonesia has the fastest deforestation rate in the world and vast areas of its rainforests are being replaced with rows and rows of a single type of tree – the oil palm. Wildlife cannot survive in these plantations.

The species’ status on the IUCN Red List: critically endangered.

If you are interested in supporting the Orangutan Foundation International, please visit their official website orangutan.org

Playful Sumatran orangutan child

I had a full day here and enjoyed it immensely, all the animals were in great condition and had large living areas, many of the animals were very close to me so giving great photo opportunities. The zoo itself is huge and there are many animals worth visiting for both children and adults. Highly recommended!

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.
Useful information
Állatkerti krt. 6-12
1146, Budapest
Hungary
Monday
09:00 – 18:00
Tuesday
09:00 – 18:00
Wednesday
09:00 – 18:00
Thursday
09:00 – 18:00
Friday
09:00 – 18:00
Saturday
09:00 – 19:00
Sunday
09:00 – 19:00

3300 HUF (full), 2500 HUF (reduced).

Budapest map

The zoo is located on the northwest side of the City Park of Budapest, central Hungary. It can be reached by metro line 1 (Széchenyi fürdő stop).

Where to stay: Best Hotels in Budapest, Hungary

I hope you enjoyed my Budapest Zoo post. If you love animals and like visiting aquariums and zoos, here are a few more posts that I recommend you read next:

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